Tag Archives: Reds

Suncorp Sayonara

What was billed as a double header with four nations involved turned out to be a fizzer due to coronavirus with a paltry 7335 swallowed by the cavernous 52,000-seat Suncorp Stadium. Not that the action on the field suffered. With the tenacious Sunwolves holding out the mighty crusaders in the first half nearly going to the break 7-all. It was only basic errors up against a far superior opponent that meant that the scoreline got away to14-49 loss, despite their numerical advantage of two players at the death. Jake Shatz said he was proud of the way his boys stuck it to the more fancied Kiwis and as the Japanese coach, Naoya Okubo, told me after the match that the camaraderie amongst his squad being away from their Tokyo base for so long has been great. Of course, having a few local Aussie members has helped and there has been no shortage of local clubs bending over backwards to provide training pitches non gratis.

The Reds, unaffected by the lower then normal turnout, proved my early assessment correct that this cohort will go places. Down 0-17 they dug deep to show the faithful that their 4-try haul against the Crusaders last week could be backed up scoring 41 unanswered points to win 41-17. Captain courageous, Liam Wright (picture courtesy of Brendan Hertel QRU), has put Michael Hooper on notice that his cushy multi-million dollar contract might mean he can purchase more houses on Sydney’s North Shore but he doesn’t haven’t a mortgage on the Wallabies position.

Another massive performance from Lukan Salakai-Loto, who told me after the match he prefers No. 6 for the Wallabies, and BrisbaneRugby favourite son Isaac Lucus added to the positives from this match ahead of Super Rugby going into a hiatus. And when live-wire halfback Tate McDermott came on the team lifted another notch.

CJ with Tate McDermott on Instagram @brisbanerugbycom

The Sun Also Rises

The nomadic Sunwolves should make the Sunshine State their home base in their final Super Rugby season, moreover Townsville in the north with a new 25,000-seat stadium. It would be a win-win for all parties concerned starting with their match against the Reds on April 5. The north has been crying out for a Super Rugby match, something they haven’t experienced since 2006 and, as I reported last year, there is a healthy following of rugby union up there: https://brisbanerugby.com/2019/07/09/rugby-in-the-regions/.

With the onset of coronavirus tourism has had a huge setback and I’m sure Tourism & Events Minister, Kate Jones, would bend over backwards to help the Japanese team out. The extra Japanese eyeballs on the area would be welcome, especially if they played out the rest of their ‘home’ games there and their Tokyo supporters made there way to Tropical Queensland.

Honorable Member for Ashgrove, Kate Jones. Photo courtsy of The Courier Mail.

The Sunwolves are like ronin, or masterless samurai, although they are a motley crew of ex-pat Aussie, Kiwis, South Africans and some Japanese they do have some local Queensland representatives, such as captain Jake Shatz, to build some domestic support behind moving forward especially if they evolve into a team in Global Rapid Rugby next season. I know Tim Horan’s son Alex, who debuted for the Sunwolves two weeks ago in New Zealand, has two compatriots in Townsville at James Cook University that played Colts with him in Brisbane that would be getting behind the side.

Twiggy Forrest’s Global Rapid Rugby

Revamped Reds on Kiwi Crusade

There’s a lot to like about this 2020 Reds side despite only one win from six outings. Easing Brisbanerugby favourite Izaac Lukus back into the starting pivot as James O’Conner sits out this week with the ankle injury he sustained in last weeks loss to the Sharks at Lang Park. I like what Brad Thorn is doing over at Ballymore resting his chargers, such as livewire halfback Tate McDermott coming off the pine today in Christchurch as he has chosen to start with Samoan national rep, Scott Malolua at 9. Also, Wallaby utility forward, Lukan Salakaia-Loto is back starting replacing Izack Rodda (calf niggle) in the second row, with Angus Scott-Young retained as blind side flanker.

I’m thinking 2010 Reds under Ewen McKenzie and we all know what happened in 2011.

Reds Ravage Hapless Sunwolves

Almost 12,000 people (official crowd 11,798) watched the first home match for the Reds at Suncorp Stadium last night; a 37% increase from the 8,600 that last year watched this fixture against the Sunwolves. Scoring 10 tries to 1, to win 64-5, is sure to bring the faithful supporters back and Brad Thorn said he was very excited about this team. He said, having someone like Hunter Paisami coming in for the injured Jordan Petaia was a revelation. A player in the mold that Thorn likes; trains hard with a good attitude.

Thorn has said earlier this season that his younger chargers have been progressing for a number of years, whether it be Schoolboys, U19s, U20s or NRC: “90% of our players have come through the system here in Queensland, which shows what we are trying to do here.”

The prodigal son, Jame O’Conner, erased his 2015 Reds nightmare last night as he orchestrated the Reds highest ever Super Rugby score; eclipsing there previous best 53-3 in 2011 against the Rebels..

Rugby in the Regions

Having returned from just over a month in North Queensland, I am buoyed by the fact that the boutique sport of rugby union in Australia is growing healthily in the regional areas of Queensland. Despite not being able to watch my beloved Queensland Reds play Super Rugby on one of Townsville’s The Ville Casino’s numerous television screens, I did encounter plenty of diehard rugby people in FNQ, none more so than my mate Severin “Bunny” Andreassen from Brothers Cairns, now the President of Brothers Juniors in Townsville. His son Jack is a rugby development officer for Townsville and District Rugby Union (TDRU) and shows a passion for the game like his father. I watched him play a spirited match for Brothers’ 1st Grade side against a strong Teachers-West at Mike Carney Toyota Park (above, where I had played myself for a Brisbane Colts v North Queensland side, back in the day).

The Ville
The Ville Casino, Townsville

Club rugby in Townsville has this year seen the merger of Western Districts with James Cook University (JCU) which Wests President, Athol Giddens, told me was a much needed shot in the arm for both clubs -especially since JCU had recently started a rugby league team. The 2019 amalgamation has provided a junior club for JCU to develop players from and proper training facilities, with lighting –far superior to Wests‘ previous locations, I was told. I watched them going through their paces at the university under the guidance of Kiwi ex-pat, Campbell Yates, whom Giddens would like to have several of. “The main issue is finding quality coaches and getting them accredited with Level 1 and 2 coaching certificates from the QRU,” Giddens said.Western Suburbs Townsville

The tyranny of distance is always an issue in the bush. However, they are rugged people up north and travelling over an hour one way for a Saturday fixture is not unheard of. Charters Towers is over an hour and a half away and they are in the Townsville competition, along with Burdekin and Ingham. Brothers Townsville are traditionally the stronghold, though lately Teachers-West has built up their ranks and have two quality backs in Curtis Rayment and Josh Fletcher. Both these local boys orchestrated Teachers’ 54-0 win over a young Brothers side, in a match where plenty of passion was on display.

During my time in Townsville, I also met Brolgas stalwart coach, John Rauch, for many lunchtime conversations at the school we were both teaching at. Originally from New South Wales, he has taken a passionate interest in the rugby scene in North Queensland over the past 30 odd years, playing for Brothers Townsville before being involved in coaching. Every two years, around Easter, Rauch takes a representative side from Townsville, under the Brolgas banner, to Japan to play select schools over there. Later this year, he will take a team from The Cathedral School to Europe for rugby union matches -another bi-annual trip he organises at his school.

The Cathedral School
The Cathedral School is a 100-year-old co-ed boarding school in Townsville.

Last week, the Queensland Junior State Championships were held at Downlands College in Toowoomba. It was great to see representative teams from all over the State, including the Brolgas from Townsville. One of my students who I had seen play in Townsville made the U13 Brolgas side which I was pretty chuffed about. Next month we see Townsville host the annual Queensland School Sport (QSS) 11-12 years rugby union championship, which bodes well for the future of our code. In a rugby league stronghold, ‘the game they play in heaven’ is in good hands.

Cowboy supporters at Dairy Farmers
The NRL Cowboys are a big deal in North Queensland

 

Before the Sun Sets on the Sunwolves

Last year in Tokyo the Sunwolves set ChiChiBu-no-Miya Stadium alight with their sublime 63-28 demolition of the lackluster Queensland Reds. In March, at the same stadium in Tokyo, in front of a boisterous crowd, a repeat was on the cards until the Reds scored to level at 31-all near the end and Hamish Stewart manged a penalty goal after full-time to get the Reds out of jail with their first win of the season 34-31.

The Sunwolves are hunting in a pack. Photo courtesy of Getty Sports

Two weeks ago they defeated the NSW Waratahs 31-29 in a Friday match at Newcastle Stadium. In March they had beaten the Waikato Chiefs in Hamilton, New Zealand, 30-15, for their first away win. Unfortunately, SANZAAR later decided, with the JFRU withdrawing their support, that the team will be cut from Super Rugby after the completion of the 2020 media contract. With the Top League overlapping the Super Rugby season next year, the Sunwolves won’t be as strong as they are displaying this year; more reason to attend.

CJ and Brad Thorn might have a side bet on the result.. Photo courtesy of @brisbanerugby on Instagram

Find the event at Brisbanerugby.com on Facebook and show your interest by giving me an indication of how many tickets you would like at a reduced price. Payment can be made up until the day before the event through the Commonwealth Bank, Australia account Brisbanerugby BSB: 064-128. Account Number: 10373547.

See you there

CJ

Japan & Friend’s Day

For those heading to the Rugby World Cup this year in Japan your journey starts this Saturday on the Gold Coast. The Japan Community of Queensland Inc. cordially invite you to immerse yourself into Japanese food, culture and the people at Albert Waterways Community Centre in Broadbeach from 10am to 5pm. Proudly supported by the Japanese Consulate in Brisbane and Brisbanerugby, this is your first step of the incredible journey for the World Cup to be hosted outside of a ‘traditional‘ rugby nation.

Some of the 20 nations competing at RWC2019 in Japan from September 20th.

4年に一度じゃない。一生に一度だ。

(yon-nen ni ichi-do jyanai. Isshou-ni ichi-do da.)

The catch cry for this year’s World Cup is, “Not every 4 years. Once in a lifetime.” Basically meaning that this will be the ONLY time in your lifetime to experience such an event in Asia.

For those heading to the Rugby World Cup this year in Japan your journey starts this Saturday on the Gold Coast.
CJ with the Web Ellis trophy at the Landmark Plaza in Yokohama last year.

Japan has a proud history of rugby dating back to 1889, when Edward Bramwell Clarke, an instructor in English language and literature at Keio University at the time, began teaching rugby together with fellow Cambridge alumnus Ginnosuke Tanaka. Enthusiasm for rugby grew in Japan, led mainly by the university and high school students. University rugby became increasingly popular because of the top teams from Waseda, Keio, Meiji and Doshisha Universities, peaking between the 1980s and early 1990s. From 2016 the Tokyo based Sunwolves entered the Super Rugby competition and played a very competitive match against the Queensland Reds last weekend in Tokyo, narrowly losing 34-31 in the final play.

Some Queensland Reds and Super W players will be on hand around 2pm for autographs and some rugby fun. We are very privileged to have a Japanese player from the Women’s Reds Team, Asako-chan, as well to demonstrate the pathways open to those that persevere, “Fight-o” in Japanese.

For those heading to the Rugby World Cup this year in Japan your journey starts this Saturday on the Gold Coast.
Asako-chan will be arriving straight after training at Ballymore to be on hand to tell us her story.

CJ

Queensland Country Looking Good for Another NRC Premiership

On Sunday, fans braved the second half rain at Bond University to watch the National Rugby Championship semi-final between last year’s premiers Queensland Country and the Western Force. The star-studded Country outfit did not fail to impress from the getgo with tries aplenty in the first 20 minutes. None more so than 2018 Reds bolter, 18-year-old Jordan Petaia. Some very impressive running from the young Wallabies squad member playing at outside-centre with two tries in 15 minutes under the watchful eye of Reds coach Brad Thorn, who was standing beside me. From our vantage point, Caleb Timu also ran in for a five-pointer, on the blindside, with the Western Force down to 13 men.

Jordan Petaia Country
Young gun, 18-year-old, Jordan Petaia running strongly in the NRC semi-final. Photo courtesy of Getty

Hamish Stewart did not bring his kicking boots which proved costly in the first half as Qld Country went to the sheds up only 20-14, after Western Force kicker, Ian Prior, converted their first two tries. Stewart did make-up for his earlier failures with the boot in the second half with two conversions and two penalty goals, but leaving points out there was scrutinised by Reds coach Thorn.

CJ & Brad Thorn
CJ with Brad Thorn enjoying the early tries by Queensland Country at Bond University. Photo CJ on Instagram @brisbanerugbycom

In the 53rd minute, referee Damon Murphy called the match off due to the lightning in the area, but after about 15 minutes the play was back on. A few spectators left at this juncture, however, there were plenty that stayed, eager to watch more from the impressive Queensland Country outfit. The final score was 45-24 to the home side, booking them a place in next weeks final in Suva against Fiji Drua.

Queensland Country coach, Rod Seib, said, “I’m really pleased with the team’s performance today. The team delivered.”

Some real standout performances by Caleb Timu and Angus Scott-Young that should see them get a future call-up to the Wallabies.

Centre of attack

Tim Horan & Jeff Wilson
Tim Horan on the attack against the All Blacks’ Jeff Wilson

By Chris Rea

(First published on 15th October 1999)

 
The last Rugby World Cup of the century began with much fanfare at the Millenium Stadium in Cardiff two weeks ago. The top seeds won their pool games quite easily through the second week provided some interesting results.

The first real match-ups of rugby heavyweights took place last weekend with New Zealand verse England and Australia v Ireland.

In the former game, England realised it had to play 15-man rugby to repeat their finals appearance of 1991, but the superiority of the All Blacks came to the fore in Jonah Lomu. As in the 1995 tournament, the 58th minute proved Lomu was back with a trademark 60 metre run through the English backs to break the 16-16 deadlock.

New Zealand scored a further try by in-form halfback replacement Byron Kelleher and took the match 30-16.

In the latter match, the passionate Irish couldn’t back up their rough play with any try-scoring opportunities and the Wallabies went away with two tries to win a scrappy contest 23-3.

Instrumental in the win was mid-field saviour Tim Horan. As he was in the successful 1991 campaign three-Cup veteran Horan is the centre of attack.

I caught up with Tim Horan before he and the team left Australia a few weeks ago on a typical early spring day in Brisbane.

In contrast to the light rain that fell at Lansdowne Road before Sunday’s match, blue sky with the sun shining brightly greeted me as I parked out the front of Tim’s Queenslander house. His daughter directed me to ‘the office’ where the interview was conducted.

It had been about 10 years since we played in the Colts (under 19) “Dream Team” that won the 1988 Grand Final convincingly and just like then he can still carve through backlines as he proved with vintage aplomb on Sunday against the Irish.

Webb Ellis TrophyThe Aussie campaign to “Bring back Bill”, the affectionate name they have given the William Webb Ellis trophy, is underway and November 6, just three weeks off, is looming as a very significant day for a young nation entering the new millennium.

For also on that day a referendum will be carried out in Australia to decide whether to become a republic or hold onto a dying monarchy. The players have already voted and Captain John Eales had one regret that they won’t be playing England on that day.

“It would have been good to play England in the final,” he said. “We could stuff them on the field – and stuff them in the vote.”

I asked Tim his opinion as to Australia winning the 1999 World Cup. He said, “We have a fairly good chance, but Ireland won’t be easy.”

“At the moment we are concentrating mainly on Wales in the quarters”.

He didn’t seem too concerned about Larkham’s injury noting that it was not as bad as the thumb injury he sustained in a Super 12 match where he had to go off at halftime.

His lack of concern proved justified as Larkham had a solid return to test match level rugby last Sunday and again yesterday against the Americans.

At the moment we are concentrating on Wales in the quarters’

Tim Horan

Australia’s chances of regaining the Webb Ellis trophy are looking pretty good. As Bob Dwyer stated in his 1992 autobiography that the best two prepared teams contested the final in 1991 and should that be the case this time the Wallabies (and the Kiwis) are starting to come good at the right time.

An emphatic win over the Kiwis at Stadium Australia, 34-9, in front of 107,000+ people was a psychological shot in the arm after some lacklustre games preceding it.

“The atmosphere was ecstatic…great for Australian rugby”, Tim said. “Crowd support like that is something we don’t often get in Australia.”

“In New Zealand and South Africa you come to expect to play 16 (including the crowd) but at Stadium Australia it was excellent.”

This game provided the springboard for Australia’s assault at retaining rugby’s Holy Grail, the Webb Ellis trophy.

In a year that has seen our cricketers, hockey and netball players win their respective world championships it would be another piece of silverware on the mantelpiece of a proud young nation.

Australia’s first match of the tournament was against Romania in Belfast. Once again Tim Horan proved too good for the weak defence and scored in less time then it takes to pour a pint of Guinness (119 seconds).

For his effort, sponsors Guinness will donate £10,000 to the charity of his choice (this probably should go to the under-financed Romanian rugby team).

The tournament run by the Five Nations has had its detractors noting the lop-sided results. But as Sydney Morning Herald writer Peter FitzSimons says, “Wouldn’t rugby league love the chance to show it had a similar array of cultures, backgrounds and socio-economic firepower united through a common passion?”

IMG_0268
CJ & Peter FitzSimons

When Australia hosts the next rugby World Cup in 2003 these same arguments will be brought out along with the problems of where each game will be held.

As rugby has become professional the bottom line has been to make as much return from the game as is put in and that means bums on seats.

At the present World Cup, we have seen good numbers at games in England, France and Wales but poor ones for matches in Scotland.

The Scottish Rugby Union is responsible for this balls-up due to their traditional opposition to any innovations or improvements of the game and their initial rejection of having a World Cup when first raised by the IRB.

I remember asking a Scottish friend about tickets for the World Cup early this year and he told me that even the clubs are finding it hard to obtain any – what a travesty that has proven

Fast forward to 2003 where the Australian Rugby Union (ARU) is calling the shots, will the spectators be looked after then?

Will Queensland, a strong backyard for Wallaby talent, be overlooked for the choice matches by Melbourne; or even Perth?

ARU head, John O’Neill has decided not to give Brisbane a Bledisloe Cup match next year opting for Melbourne where rugby is hardly played because they can guarantee numbers through the turnstiles.

However, when I asked Tim about the lack of major test matches in Brisbane he cited that only 34,000 people came to Suncorp Stadium for the Tri-nations match against South Africa in July.

With the present debates over a super-stadium in Brisbane in the professional age of rugby, Queensland may be left out on a limb.

The debacle when Queensland topped the Super 12 and was given a home semi-final over whether to play at Ballymore or Suncorp Stadium meant that those schoolboys who supported the Reds all season weren’t allowed to use their schoolboy passes.

Subsequently, many locals boycotted and a proportionally larger Kiwi contingent turned up to see Canterbury outplay an uninterested Queensland side.

A further point I raised with Tim was that of the end of season Rico Challenge played between Queensland, New South Wales and ACT.

He supported the concept saying it is a good way for fringe players to get a Super 12 contract.

Although spectators to these games are low if marketed properly and positioned better in the rugby calendar, as proposed, we may see this problem overcome.

Finally, I asked Tim of his plans after the World Cup.

“Well I have another year to go on my Super 12 contract, but after that, I’d like to play in Europe”, he said.

“The pressure of Super 12 and test matches are great and I’d like to relax for a while with my family”.

No chance of following in your father’s footsteps and entering politics?

“No way!!!” he replied.

“You could give me a million bucks for a day in politics and I’d say no.

“For all the hard work my father does he doesn’t seem to get any popular response”.

The interview ended at 3pm as Tim apologized that he had to pick up one of the kids from school.

This weekend the final pool matches of the World Cup will be wrapped up with Pool D looking the closest; the clash between France and Fiji to determine the winner of Pool C being unclear; and England against Tonga no certainty.

You could give me a million bucks for a day in politics and I’d say no.”

Tim Horan

New Zealand’s hundred plus points against Italy was very impressive while Australia’s line was crossed for the first time this tournament by the USA, but went on to win 55-19.

Finishing the top of pool E Australia is guaranteed a semi-final berth, however, they will be without star running loose forward Toutai Kefu banned for 14 days for his toe-to-toe with Ireland’s enforcer Trevor Brennan.

Australian coach Rod McQueen was upset about the “selective citations”, but acknowledges the tournament has been well run.

Whichever team holds aloft the Webb Ellis trophy on November 6 rugby will be the real winner.

クアード・クーパーはどこにも行かない

Quade_Cooper_2014
クアード・クーパー

その日、ウローウィンのシャウ通りには四千人を超える人々が集まった。クィーンズランドラグビーユニオンと豪ラグビーユニオンの双方から十分に報酬を得ながらもブリスベンのプレミアコンペティションの地元ラグビーパークに隠れていた魔術師を見るためだ。今冬季はチプシーウッドのレギュラーメンバーとして数えきれない人に真のエンターテイメントを提供してきている人物だ。筆者は彼のその実力をタダで(ビール代はかかるが)見ていることに罪悪感すら覚えるほどだ。

多くの人がトップレベルでプレーする彼を待っている。彼はレベルが高いところに行く程に良いプレーをすることはすでに先週の日曜に証明されているのだ。ブリスベン市の五つのトライのうち(一つは彼自身で)四つはクーパーのオフロードからだった。62分でのチームメイトのジェイデン・ガマヌには特に。ブリスベン市は47対29でティム・サムソン率いるウエスタンフォースに惜しくも負けてしまったが、レッズの選手であふれている彼らもコンビネーションを調節すれば勝利するだろう。

JP on the charge

今週にかけてクアード・クーパーの今後には多くの憶測があった。例えばティム・ホーランの話ではサンウォルブスがクーパーの獲得に前向きであり、さらには豪ラグビーユニオンがクィーンズランドラグビーユニオンとレベルズとクーパーのマネージャのコーダー・ナッサーとの間での話の詳細も公表した。

月曜の朝、ナッサーは私に言った。彼はニュージーランドから始まり、世界中のどこからのオファーも視野に入れていたと。さらにナッサーは豪ラグビーユニオンと財産灘のクィーンズランドラグビーユニオンが選手開発の費用捻出のために最低でも80万ドルオフを希望していたとも語ってくれた。しかしクアードは揺るがない。むしろ大観客を率いれて来シーズンもチプシーウッドで走り回ることに満足している。それは長い目で見れば決してお金の無駄遣いではない。

これからの数週間の間にクーパーがどんな決断をしたとしても彼は支えられるべきであり、この気まぐれな天才は彼のプレイする場所ならどこへでも観衆を連れてくるだろう、シャウ通りから札幌までにでも。

Translated from original article “Quade Cooper Isn’t Going Anywhere”, published September 7th, 2018, by Reina Delos Santos (Brisbanerugby staff translator)