Helping out your Mates

Back in 2011, I was introduced to the guys from the Shekou Rugby Club in Shenzhen. On Wednesday nights, we would gather at the grounds of SIS near Seaworld in Shekou, Shenzhen, China and play touch rugby. It’s always a convivial motley crew of men and women from France, Australia, New Zealand, America, PNG, Italy, Japan, China, Hong Kong and elsewhere. It was here I ran into this friendly Australian, John Graham. Always having a laugh and telling us how he was doing a segment on a US Golf Show. A very genuine person that would never question helping you out. Often we would run into each other ‘downtown’ in Futian, Shenzhen having a few drinks and a laugh.

John Graham

At that time he was running a successful gym, Fusion, near the waterfront in Shekou that many of the rugby players attended. There was a lot of positivity in that gym and everyone said it was great. (I even had a training session there). Well that has turned out to be his Achilles heel as he was duped by a Chinese businessman who took over the business. I will let John take up the story below:

John’s campaign https://gogetfunding.com/being-wrongfully-sued-in-china/

If you can at all help John out, in anyway you can, please do.

Advertisements

The rising sun sets on the sunwolves

Back in 2016, a major revolution was afoot with the expansion of Super Rugby to 18 teams across six countries, four unions, both hemisphere’s and numerous time zones. The convoluted system incorporating four conferences was too hard to comprehend and player fatigue due to frequent flyer mileage was a factor that was difficult to manage. Micromanagement saw the teams culled to 15, but this is also seen as too cumbersome and a new 14 or 15-team competition will begin after the current broadcast deal expires next year; starting in 2021.

I remember in 2009 on the Gold Coast talking with then Japanese coach and All Black legend, John Kirwan. I brought up the idea of having a Japanese based Super Rugby franchise, to which Jk said, “No-way, impossible, the company teams in Japan are way too powerful“. In Australia, we could see the merit of a Japanese team with the time-slot 1 hour behind Eastern Standard Time wedged between the Western Force matches in Perth.

No-way, impossible, the company teams in Japan are way too powerful“.

Fast forward to 2019 and another All Black legend, current Queensland Reds coach, Brad Thorn. He’s come out strongly supporting the Sunwolves. After last Saturday’s match at Chichibu-no-Miya Stadium in Tokyo saying, “Look at that game today, look at the Sunwolves this season, they’ve been outstanding. It’s so good for rugby in Japan, look at the crowd. It would be disappointing and sad if Sunwolves were no longer part of it.

CJ with Brad Thorn both showing support the Sunwolves. Photo CJ on Instagram @brisbanerugbycom

Unfortunately, it’s official that from the Super Rugby 2021 season the Sunwolves will no longer be a part of the competition. In the words of SANZAAR CEO Andy Marino, “The decision to further consolidate the competition format to a 14-team round robin was not taken lightly. It has involved some detailed analysis and a thorough review of the current and future rugby landscape, tournament costs, commercial and broadcast considerations and player welfare in line with our Strategic Plan.”

Maybe John Kirwan was right, as sources have inferred that the JRFU never really liked the concept of the Sunwolves. This view was even voiced to SANZAAR by the JRFU as Marino reiterated, “SANZAAR was advised by the Japan Rugby Football Union (JRFU) in early March that they would no longer be in a position to financially underwrite the Sunwolves future participation post 2020. The future of the Sunwolves will now be determined by the JRFU which has determined that Super Rugby no longer remains the best pathway for the development of players for the national team.”

There’s a lot of issues to be sorted out, with finances being a major concern, along with the disruption to the Top League season in Japan. Moving forward, it’s time to have a good chat with Andrew Forrest about becoming a part of Global Rapid Rugby.

Twiggy Forrest’s Global Rapid Rugby

CJ

Japan & Friend’s Day

For those heading to the Rugby World Cup this year in Japan your journey starts this Saturday on the Gold Coast. The Japan Community of Queensland Inc. cordially invite you to immerse yourself into Japanese food, culture and the people at Albert Waterways Community Centre in Broadbeach from 10am to 5pm. Proudly supported by the Japanese Consulate in Brisbane and Brisbanerugby, this is your first step of the incredible journey for the World Cup to be hosted outside of a ‘traditional‘ rugby nation.

Some of the 20 nations competing at RWC2019 in Japan from September 20th.

4年に一度じゃない。一生に一度だ。

(yon-nen ni ichi-do jyanai. Isshou-ni ichi-do da.)

The catch cry for this year’s World Cup is, “Not every 4 years. Once in a lifetime.” Basically meaning that this will be the ONLY time in your lifetime to experience such an event in Asia.

For those heading to the Rugby World Cup this year in Japan your journey starts this Saturday on the Gold Coast.
CJ with the Web Ellis trophy at the Landmark Plaza in Yokohama last year.

Japan has a proud history of rugby dating back to 1889, when Edward Bramwell Clarke, an instructor in English language and literature at Keio University at the time, began teaching rugby together with fellow Cambridge alumnus Ginnosuke Tanaka. Enthusiasm for rugby grew in Japan, led mainly by the university and high school students. University rugby became increasingly popular because of the top teams from Waseda, Keio, Meiji and Doshisha Universities, peaking between the 1980s and early 1990s. From 2016 the Tokyo based Sunwolves entered the Super Rugby competition and played a very competitive match against the Queensland Reds last weekend in Tokyo, narrowly losing 34-31 in the final play.

Some Queensland Reds and Super W players will be on hand around 2pm for autographs and some rugby fun. We are very privileged to have a Japanese player from the Women’s Reds Team, Asako-chan, as well to demonstrate the pathways open to those that persevere, “Fight-o” in Japanese.

For those heading to the Rugby World Cup this year in Japan your journey starts this Saturday on the Gold Coast.
Asako-chan will be arriving straight after training at Ballymore to be on hand to tell us her story.

CJ